Title: High Treason at Catfish BendHigh Treason at Catfish Bend
Author: Ben Lucien Burman
Illustrator: Alice Caddy
Pages: 147
Recommended Ages: 11 & up
Star Rating: ★★★

Remember The Strange Invasion of Catfish Bend? Same series!

The Story.

Doc Raccoon can’t believe it. Life at Catfish Bend hasn’t always been peaceful – every set of neighbors has their disagreements – but the inhabitants have at least been contented with their homes and lives. But now the young frogs of the Glee Club have decided that California sounds like heaven and they want to move there. Before Doc Raccoon can contain them, they’ve convinced half of Catfish Bend to go with them!

Doc Raccoon and his friends, Judge Black the blacksnake and J.C. the fox all agree that moving to California sounds like a horrible idea. But as the leaders of Catfish Bend they feel responsible for all of the young folk who are moving out. So they decide they’ll go along too…

But when they finally get to California, the animals start disappearing one by one. Doc Raccoon is afraid that the dexcriptions of California’s wonders was a plot – a plot to trap them there so that they can be eaten by large predators. But who would have the nerve?

Discussion.

I began my description of The Strange Invasion of Catfish Bend with these words – “[it] isn’t just a simple story about adventurous animals. It is a highly saucy social commentary.” (Please nobody think it’s horribly snobby of me to quote myself – I was just too lazy to think of a new way to say the same thing. :]) The same is true of High Treason at Catfish Bend with one exception. The Strange Invasion was highly saucy and highly poignant. High Treason was saucy, but it didn’t have the same vim and specificity of Invasion. Instead of clearly depicting a few main follies amongst the animals, it just showed the animals as being generally folly-ful.

One hound dog considers jumping off a cliff because “life isn’t worth living”, but Doc Raccoon talks him out of it.

As in Invasion, the Brahma Bull practices yoga and the white crows offer vague foretelling of doom which come true – because the animals behave so foolishly.

Conclusion. Not quite as fun as The Strange Invasion of Catfish Bend – read that one first, then come back to Treason.

Review © 2014 Laura Verret

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